Schedule



Spring 2021 Season - Days/Times Forthcoming



Nation Building with Antonio Pacheco / A bi-weekly look at the state of public architecture in the United States, including interviews, news items, reading suggestions, and historical/theoretical frameworks for understanding public architecture more broadly.

Grounds with Amanda Ugorji / Inter-generational interviews with artists, designers, and planners that ask what existential questions they have been working through lately and how they make their decisions.

Still Standing with Eytan Levi and Ben Hoyle / Interviews with experts about the renovation of Soviet mass housing.

Conversations on Care with Ana MiljaĨki

The Open Practice Room - Ep 01

Thanks for tuning in! In this episode, I was working on the finale from Mendelssohn's violin concerto (pages 12-15 from this score).
In the score linked above, I'm really amused by the portrait of Mendelssohn that is included in the first few pages:




And here's some more on the piece - it's got its own page on Wikipedia
For those who missed the intro, here's a bit about what I envision the series to be:


I think that most of the MIT Architecture community is familiar with visual and spatial design iterations, but since a radio show takes the entire visual element out of the picture, I thought it might be fun for those of you less familiar with the classical music scene to hear how “iterations” sound like for classical musicians.

One frustration I have with classical music is the stereotype that it’s pretentious and highbrow. One of the aims I have is to break down that stereotype and show you a different side of classical music, the backstage one that isn’t as celebrated as the polished onstage performances. It is a beautiful artistic journey to think about what the composer intended when they notated the music some hundred years ago, and to hone your technique to support your interpretation and reincarnation of that music.

At the very least, I hope that listening to some live, unpolished, work-in-progress music can be some source of comfort to you wherever you are at this time!


This is my first time doing this in this sort of format. Feel free to send me feedback (what you liked and want to hear more of) at dfang [at] mit.edu . You can see more of my usual format at my "violinstagram" @df.violin . My latest post (also embedded below) actually focuses on one of the trouble spots that was featured in this episode.


You can also listen to the episode in the archive here.

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